Azel®/Glenza® 28 Capsules

Enzalutamide 40mg / 80mg

From USD $390.00 (EUR €323.70)

Enzalutamide, sold under the brand name Xtandi, is a nonsteroidal antiandrogen medication that is used in the treatment of prostate cancer. Enzalutamide can be used as an antiandrogen in feminizing hormone therapy for transgender women. Enzalutamide is provided in the form of 40 mg or 80 mg Capsules. It is taken orally at a dosage of 160 mg once per day. Enzalutamide is contraindicated in women during pregnancy.

Enzalutamide is clinically effective in the treatment of mCRPC. An up to 89% decrease in serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels has been reported after a month of taking the drug. PSA level decreased more than 50% in 40 of 65 chemo-naive patients and 38 of 75 chemotherapy-treated patients. Median time to radiographic progression was 56 weeks for chemo-naive patients and 25 weeks for the post-chemotherapy population.

Brand name: Xtandi
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Description

What is Enzalutamide 40mg / 80mg Xtandi Generic?

Enzalutamide capsules is used in the treatment of cancer of the prostate gland. It may be also used to treat other conditions, as determined by the doctor. It works by blocking the effects of male hormones such as testosterone. It is indicated for use in conjunction with castration in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, and metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer (mCSPC). Enzalutamide works by blocking the effect of the hormone testosterone on prostate cancer cells. Without testosterone, prostate cancer cells can’t grow, even if they have spread to other parts of the body. Enzalutamide has been shown to help some men live longer. It can also help to treat or delay symptoms, such as pain and bone problems.

It is taken by mouth. Side effects of enzalutamide, when added to castration, include asthenia, back pain, diarrhea, arthralgia, and hot flashes. Rarely, it can cause seizures. It has a high potential for drug interactions. Enzalutamide is an antiandrogen and acts as an antagonist of the androgen receptor, the biological target of androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. In doing so, it prevents the effects of these hormones in the prostate gland and elsewhere in the body. Enzalutamide was first described in 2006 and was introduced for the treatment of prostate cancer in 2012. It was the first second-generation NSAA to be introduced. The medication is available throughout the world as a treatment solution for cancer of the prostate gland.

Enzalutamide is used to treat prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body in men and who have been helped by certain medical and surgical treatments that decrease testosterone levels. It is also used to treat prostate cancer in men who have not been helped by certain medical and surgical treatments that decrease testosterone levels. Enzalutamide is in a class of medications called androgen receptor inhibitors. It works by blocking the effects of androgen (a male reproductive hormone) to stop the growth and spread of cancer cells.

Enzalutamide should be taken with or without food, preferably at a fixed time every day. Your doctor will decide what dose is necessary and how often you need to take it. This will depend on what you are being treated for and may change from time to time. You should take it exactly as your doctor has advised. Taking it in the wrong way or taking too much can cause very serious side effects. It may take several weeks or months for you to see or feel the benefits but do not stop taking it unless your doctor tells you to.

Headache, hot flashes, weakness and high blood pressure is a very common side effect of this medicine. Other than this, yellowing of the skin, loss of appetite, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, dark urine, and skin rashes might be observed as side effects. Regular blood tests are required to check your blood cells along with liver function during treatment with this medicine. It makes your skin more sensitive to sunlight, hence take extra caution while going out.

Before taking it, tell your doctor if have diabetes, seizures, liver, or kidney problems or are taking any medicines to treat infections. Many other medicines can affect, or be affected by, this medicine so let your doctor know all medications you are using. This medicine is not recommended during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. The use of effective contraception by both males and females during treatment is important to avoid pregnancy. You may be asked for regular monitoring of blood glucose level while on treatment.


What is prostate cancer?

The prostate gland is a small walnut-sized gland that produces a fluid called seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperms in males. The most common symptom of prostate cancer is difficulty with urination, but sometimes there are no symptoms at all. Enzalutamide decreases or stops the growth of cancer cells by decreasing the amount of testosterone (a natural hormone in males) in men. This also relieves difficulty in passing urine and makes it easier for you to urinate.


How Enzalutamide is thought to work?

Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor inhibitor. Androgens are a group of hormones that includes testosterone. Androgen receptor inhibitors interfere with the connection between androgens and androgen receptors. This can help slow cancer cell growth.

When androgen connects with an androgen receptor, it may cause tumor cells to grow. Enzalutamide helps to decrease how often androgen can connect with an androgen receptor. This can keep tumors from growing. As a result, the prostate tumor may stop growing and the cancer cells may die.

  • Non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC): Men taking Enzalutamide had a 71% lower chance of their cancer progressing compared with men not taking Enzalutamide during the study. Progression was defined as cancer getting worse, as measured by scans, or if the patient died for any reason.
  • Metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer (mCSPC): Men taking Enzalutamide had a 61% lower chance of their cancer progressing compared with men not taking Enzalutamide during the study. Progression was defined as cancer getting worse, as measured by scans, or if the patient died for any reason.
  • Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC): Men taking Enzalutamide had an 83% lower chance of their cancer progressing compared with men not taking Enzalutamide during the study. Progression was defined as cancer getting worse, as measured by scans, or if the patient died for any reason.

Additional Information

Composition

Enzalutamide 40mg / 80mg

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